Thank you to all of our 2015 Western Monarch Thanksgiving Count participants!

Final results are now available on our data page.
Every year in late summer and early fall, western monarchs journey back to more than 200 overwintering sites up and down the California coast. Here, they gather by the dozens, hundreds, and even thousands to rest for the winter, before mating in the spring and starting the cycle all over again. Citizen scientists monitor these overwintering groves each year, gathering information on habitat conditions and estimating population numbers. The highlight of this effort is the annual Western Monarch Thanksgiving Count (WMTC), which takes place for three weeks around the Thanksgiving holiday. To learn more about the count and find out how you can get involved, read more here. If you're visiting an overwintering site, don't forget to keep an eye out for tags this season too!

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I released 6 tagged Monarchs in the last two days and I have 15 more pupating. Keep a watch out for them. ... See MoreSee Less

2 months ago  ·  

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Mexico numbers are in! 4.01 hectares = 150 million monarchs, up from just 1.13 hectares= 42 million monarchs in 2014. Good news, but still a long way to go to the 6 hectare recovery goal set by USFWS. ... See MoreSee Less

4 months ago  ·  

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Spring has sprung: with warmer weather and flowers blooming, monarchs are becoming more active and breeding at sites along the California coast. ... See MoreSee Less

4 months ago  ·  

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